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Consider the Cow

Pastor Nick, a friend of mine, tweeted this:

Anyone else realize that they need to “chew the cud” when it comes to meditating on Scripture? (link)

cowAs I read that tweet I had a mental image of a cow chewing. And chewing. And chewing. All to properly digest its food.

It reminded me of something that King Solomon is credited with saying, “Go to the ant… Consider her ways and be wise” (Proverbs 6:6, NKJV).

I tweeted back that Nick should write a blog entry titled “Consider The Cow,” but as soon as I sent that I wanted to use it. Because while Nick tweeted about needing to “chew the cud” in the context of meditating on scripture, I think it is also the very thing we need to do as medical students.

With the sheer amounts of information thrown at us it is very easy to try and speed through the various reading assignments. But when trying to memorize, repetition is the key. Slowing down and taking time is paramount (although one cannot be too slow). Without doing so, the material is quickly forgotten — or at least the details eventually slip away.

And as they say, the devil is in the details. It will be the little things that trip us up on an exam. When considering a clinical case, one little detail can mean the difference between a diagnosis of schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder.

So go to the cow. Consider her ways, and be wise! Take time to process the material and linger a few moments longer on the little details that help to differentiate (and here I am writing this for me more than anyone else).

Now if the details are that important, if they can lead to making man whole — or at least helping them get better — then would that mean that God is in the details?

I suppose that would be a topic best left to the philosophy and theology bloggers…

Me? I’ll just put up my brand new cow poster. And every time I see it I will remember to slow down and properly digest my “food.”

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  • Nick

    Excellent post Jeff! I can apply this to my studies here at the seminary as well. One thing though is that we can’t get too bogged down in the details, otherwise we’ll learn nothing. There needs to be a healthy balance.

  • Nick

    Excellent post Jeff! I can apply this to my studies here at the seminary as well. One thing though is that we can’t get too bogged down in the details, otherwise we’ll learn nothing. There needs to be a healthy balance.